Entries in fiction (180)

Thursday
Jan102019

Echoes of Understorey

So at first, this book was a bit jarring because it wasn't about Unar, the MC of the first book in the trilogy. But it appears that the setting (and secondary characters) are the only real constant with these books. The final book looks like it will be about yet another character.

Which is fine, especially since the MC of this book, Imeris, who was just a baby in Crossroads of Canopy, is a much more compelling character than Unar ever was. Where Unar was arrogant and self-righteous, Imeris is a practical, humble badass.

Everything about this book is so much stronger than the first. And since it follows a new MC, you can read Echoes of Understorey without having read Crossroads of Canopy and probably not be confused at all. Unar makes an appearance, as do many of the side characters from her journey. The familiarity is nice. But Imeris is a much stronger character, not just in terms of her abilities, but in terms of the author's craft.

Anyway, Imeris is out with one goal in mind: to kill the body-snatching sorceress who was at the root of Unar's problems in book one. A lot of stuff gets in Imeris's way, most notably being swept up in a historic Hunt called by the rulers of Canopy.

Imeris is quite possibly the best warrior alive in her world, but she is humble about it and just wants to do her duty to rid her world of the sorceress and then maybe take up farming like Unar has. Unlike Unar, Imeris doesn't want to be a legend at all, though she doesn't shun her legendary status once she achieves it. She uses it for good.

Like with the first book ending with Unar on a new, vastly different adventure, Imeris finds herself on the cusp of something new and exciting. The next book will focus on her brother Leaper, but I hope to see some of Imeris in her new role.

Anyway, the setting is superb, the action is excellent and the characters are all wonderful and well-crafted. Highly recommend checking this out!

Monday
Oct012018

Exit Strategy

It's impossible for me to talk about the Murderbot diaries without gushing so you're just going to have to bear with me because I just love this series so damn much! The final novella is no exception. If you haven't read All Systems Red, then pop over to my review of it and then maybe grab a copy. The series is a little dark and brutal, but also delightfully snarky and fun.

So Murderbot has been drifting through the galaxy, collecting adventures and trying to figure out just what it wants out of life. It has faced down its murderous past and started looking at ways to take down GrayCris, the corporate political entity whose murderous greed kicked off the series to begin with.

And after returning from its last adventure, Murderbot discovers that its mostly-owner and probably-friend Dr. Mensah is missing and probably in trouble. It could be nothing, it could be a trap, and Murderbot kind of just wants to hide out in a hotel and watch TV because it's having way too many feelings about all of this.

But it goes after Dr. Mensah, intending to save her and bring down GrayCris for good. It finds other members of its original team and starts plotting with them. Hilarity and chaos ensue. The ending is so good it made me laugh AND cry, at the same time.

Murderbot stories always make my black little heart grow three sizes and something about this particular book filled me with hope when I desperately needed it on this dark and stupid timeline. One of the best things about the series is that it's a novella series. These stories are snack sized. Like candy for your soul.

There's a full length Murderbot novel coming out in a couple of years and I'm super excited for it. But this final book in the novella series closes enough doors to be satisfying, but leaves enough open that I wish the novel was out already. So I highly recommend the entire series.

Monday
Sep172018

Space Unicorn Blues

I'm back from a month+ hiatus which included my first trip to WorldCon (which was cool and wherein I bumped into this novel's author, who is delightful) to tell you that you need to read this book. Everything you need to know is in the title, really. But I will try to expand upon the awesomeness that is Space Unicorn Blues.

There are a lot of things that I loved about this book. For starters, it's about a frickin space unicorn. Okay, Gary, the MC is part unicorn. But that somehow makes it even better. Everything about this book is zany. Magical creatures from mythology, referred to as Bala, are in fact real and just (often magical) aliens from other planets. And when humans reach out to the stars after destroying Earth, they make contact. And then war.

Because humans are kind of garbage. *looks at news* Yep, we're kind of garbage. One of the smart things I loved about this book is the way the author spells it out. She uses her zany world-building to magnify the garbage things we do. The lone white guy in the book is also the worst piece of shit bigot and I hate him so much. Poster boy for white mediocrity and failing up.

Anyway, there's a redemption arc in here, just not for the garbage white dude. And it takes the entire story for the mystery of Gary's "victim" to come full circle, but you'll hate garbage white dude even more when you get to it.

And while this story is a lot darker than I generally like to read, the utter insanity of the world-building and the total ass-kickingness of the two female leads -- disabled war vet, Jenny Parata, and con artist transwoman, Ricky Tang -- make it fun despite the darkness. There is some magnificent snark and banter to be found in these pages.

I could have done without all the times the bad guys misgendered Ricky, but this book had so much to say about diversity. I loved how Jenny's disability was portrayed. And it was also refreshing that sexual violence never came in to play. That's one of the many reasons my reading preference is shifting away from male authors.

And the book even offers a glimmer of hope that humans and the Bala maybe don't have to constantly be at war. The sequel comes out in the spring and I've already pre-ordered it. This has got a zany but brutal Kameron Hurley feel to it that I love.

Tuesday
Aug072018

Dragonbreath series

This is a middle grade book (for 7-12 year olds) that's basically Dennis the Menace but with dragons and other mythical beings.

The series follows Danny Dragonbreath, a real actual dragon who often has difficulties breathing fire, but whose loyalty knows no bounds. He's always accompanied by his best friend Wendell the iguana, and in later books, Christiana the crested lizard.

Danny's adventures are fun and whimsical and full of jokes, but also packed full of educational tidbits. There's also a really great bus system that can bring Danny anywhere. And if the bus doesn't go there, the portal in his great-granddad's fridge does.

Danny's adventures include evil clowns, giant bats, the deep sea, mythical Japan, fairies, phoenixes, and some very devious (but totally cute) pack rats. And the sentient potato salad.

This is a "for boys" series but me and my daughter absolutely loved it. We binge-read all 11 books in a couple of months. The author also has an excellent "for girls" series that I'll blog about later. Anyway, this series has fun illustrations and was an utter hoot to read. I highly recommend it, even if you haven't got a kiddo to read it with.

Monday
Jul232018

Skyfarer

With my Hugo reading mostly done I finally get to read books for fun again! (Okay, most of the Hugo reading has been fun, but it's also been a bit of a chore because it's reading on a deadline, which is less fun).

So this book is definitely fun. It's billed as a Star-Wars inspired space fantasy and yes, that is a very good description for it. The SW parallels are pretty obvious. I thought it also had something of a Firefly feel to it too, especially the crew's relationship to their ship, Elysium, and to each other.

It's hard to talk about this book without spoilers, but the characters are fascinating and the world-building is pretty cool and it's got a fairly diverse cast, even if the characters who get the most page-time are both white. The villain, Azrael, is especially fascinating and I look forward to seeing where his character arc goes in the next book. (I will definitely read the next book.)

Anyway, this is an exciting, somewhat fluffy space adventure that fans of Star Wars and Firefly will like. And I didn't notice it doing anything squicky with representation, so that's definitely a bonus. Go forth and enjoy!