Entries in alternate world (14)

Wednesday
Oct172018

The Fated Sky

So, it's hard to say much at all about this book without spoiling The Calculating Stars so I won't. If you liked the first you'll love the second.

The things I had issues with in the first book didn't go away for this one. The social issues that serve as antagonist were personified in Stetson Parker, first man in space. So it was interesting to see him get a bit of a redemption arc (though I never felt bad for him) while the social issues never really went anywhere. They were overcome to a point, but yeah... racists gonna racist.

The book was fun and infuriating and heartbreaking in equal measure, but it ends on a uplifting note. I had a lot of questions about some of the characters from the first book who weren't really in the second, but it looks like Mary Robinette will be writing more in the series, so I look forward to that.

Both books are really good. Mary Robinette's research is so extensive and it shows (and only rarely does it show a little too much). So go check out Calculating Stars, and if you like it, this one won't disappoint.

Monday
Oct152018

The Calculating Stars

This is alternate history sci-fi, taking place in the 50s and giving a whole new meaning to the space race after a meteor strikes the Earth in a possible extinction-level event. Instead of reaching the moon, the ultimate goal is Mars and space colonization due to fears that the Earth will very soon be uninhabitable.

And since it's the 50s and the main character, Dr. Elma York, is both a woman and an extremely gifted mathematician, sexism and racism are front and centre. While the meteor serves as a catalyst, these two social issues are the real villain throughout the book.

Elma's is a former WASP and her husband is the lead engineer working to get humans into space and give them all a future before Earth becomes inhospitable. Elma takes work as a computer with the IAC and strives to convince the men in charge that women belong on the astronaut teams.

But in addition to fighting the racism and sexism of the day, Elma has to overcome her crippling social anxiety. There are plenty of bumps and hiccups along the way.

There was a lot of cool space/rocket science stuff in this book, and Mary Robinette did some really excellent and extensive research in preparation for writing this, and that was easily one of my favourite things about it (even if some of the jargon got to be a little much). At first I didn't think I liked this book because all the ingrained racism and sexism was driving me absolutely crazy. But the end has a good pay-off to make up for that. Also, lots of hilarious rocket-related sexual innuendo. Hee!

While on the surface, this is a book about surviving an extinction event on Earth, it's really about social justice and friendships. It's a slower burn than I usually read but that doesn't mean it's boring. Highly recommend!

Monday
Oct012018

Exit Strategy

It's impossible for me to talk about the Murderbot diaries without gushing so you're just going to have to bear with me because I just love this series so damn much! The final novella is no exception. If you haven't read All Systems Red, then pop over to my review of it and then maybe grab a copy. The series is a little dark and brutal, but also delightfully snarky and fun.

So Murderbot has been drifting through the galaxy, collecting adventures and trying to figure out just what it wants out of life. It has faced down its murderous past and started looking at ways to take down GrayCris, the corporate political entity whose murderous greed kicked off the series to begin with.

And after returning from its last adventure, Murderbot discovers that its mostly-owner and probably-friend Dr. Mensah is missing and probably in trouble. It could be nothing, it could be a trap, and Murderbot kind of just wants to hide out in a hotel and watch TV because it's having way too many feelings about all of this.

But it goes after Dr. Mensah, intending to save her and bring down GrayCris for good. It finds other members of its original team and starts plotting with them. Hilarity and chaos ensue. The ending is so good it made me laugh AND cry, at the same time.

Murderbot stories always make my black little heart grow three sizes and something about this particular book filled me with hope when I desperately needed it on this dark and stupid timeline. One of the best things about the series is that it's a novella series. These stories are snack sized. Like candy for your soul.

There's a full length Murderbot novel coming out in a couple of years and I'm super excited for it. But this final book in the novella series closes enough doors to be satisfying, but leaves enough open that I wish the novel was out already. So I highly recommend the entire series.

Tuesday
Aug072018

Dragonbreath series

This is a middle grade book (for 7-12 year olds) that's basically Dennis the Menace but with dragons and other mythical beings.

The series follows Danny Dragonbreath, a real actual dragon who often has difficulties breathing fire, but whose loyalty knows no bounds. He's always accompanied by his best friend Wendell the iguana, and in later books, Christiana the crested lizard.

Danny's adventures are fun and whimsical and full of jokes, but also packed full of educational tidbits. There's also a really great bus system that can bring Danny anywhere. And if the bus doesn't go there, the portal in his great-granddad's fridge does.

Danny's adventures include evil clowns, giant bats, the deep sea, mythical Japan, fairies, phoenixes, and some very devious (but totally cute) pack rats. And the sentient potato salad.

This is a "for boys" series but me and my daughter absolutely loved it. We binge-read all 11 books in a couple of months. The author also has an excellent "for girls" series that I'll blog about later. Anyway, this series has fun illustrations and was an utter hoot to read. I highly recommend it, even if you haven't got a kiddo to read it with.

Monday
Aug062018

Rogue Protocol

This is the latest in the Murderbot diaries, a novella series about a cyborg-ish security unit who just wants to hide in its cargo box and watch TV while its humans are constantly demanding its attention. I love how Murderbot is always so down on what idiots its humans are while being begrudgingly fond of them.

In this one, Murderbot is a long way away from its almost-friends, trying not to worry about or get too attached to yet another group of humans who just can't seem to keep themselves from almost getting killed.

Murderbot is out on the edge of the galaxy, trying to find some solid evidence against the company that tried to kill its humans in the first book, All Systems Red. It gets a lot more than it bargained for in this book.

Murderbot still can't handle its soppy emotions, but is having a lot more of them, slowly inching toward acting more human. Of course, being human means being vulnerable, and Murderbot suffers a heartbreaking loss in this one that really shows it where its metaphorical heart lies, no matter how resistant it is.

The action in this story, like the others, is nonstop and the snark brilliantly keeps pace. I would ride or die for Murderbot. I've already preordered the final novella in the series and look forward to the full length novel slated to come out in a couple of years.